Challenges

This is my 365daychallenge.

What’s the concept?

I chose a new mental and physical challenge every month to accomplish over the course of 365 days. During my challenge I will be embracing discomfort, consistency and grit in order to complete 365 days’ worth of mental and physical anguish. The reward? Authentic personal fulfillment. And becoming an expert in the field of consistency, grit, and discomfort.

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MY 365 DAYS OF CHALLENGES

December: Challenge #1: 5K Outdoor 5:30 am Runs

Day 1-31

December consists of 31 days in a row of 5:30 am 5 km runs outside, in snowy, below freezing temperatures. Simple. Not fun.

January: Challenge #2: 31 days of Kickboxing/Powerlifting Prep

Day 32-62

In the month of January, I took on the challenge of kickboxing every single day. The month consisted of 31 days of intelligently hitting pads, head movement and footwork drills, bag kicks, lots of bag kicks and incorporating technical sparring. My month long of training was building on simple habits, day after day. Thanks to my coaches at Parabellum, and private coach George McDonald, and my father, a former trained kickboxer himself, I embraced myself into the technical side of kickboxing, learning to adopt, adapt and appreciate the nuances of this extremely, technical gritty sport. 

In terms of the Powerlifting aspect, I registered for GoodLife’s Mock Powerlifting meet on February 3rd. I incorporated 6 days a week of Powerlifting training to prepare myself for the February 3rd Meet.

*Powerlifting consists of your 1 rep maximum weight for each of the following 3 lifts: Squat, Bench Press, and Deadlift.

February: Challenge #3: 28 Days of YOGA

Day 63-90

Stretching, a pastime many of us neglect, yet one that increases our well-being so proficiently. I had never done more than 3 yoga classes in 1 week prior to this month’s challenge. Month 3 of my challenge afforded me the opportunity for 28 consecutive days of participating in classes ranging from Hot Power Yoga, Hot Yin Yoga, Body Flow, and basic Mind and Body Yoga practices. Committing to the art of mindfulness, balance, muscle relief and pushing the body to new intense heights is a true mental and physical test worth embracing.

March: Challenge #4: 31 Days of Swim training

Day 91-121

March was the first month of specific training for a future event I would be competing in during my 365daychallenge. Swimming, an activity that’s so natural and easy going as kids, took on a whole new meaning this month: Interval training, 1000 metre laps, exhausted shoulders, moments of breathlessness, and a whole lot of mental war fair.

April: Challenge #5: 30 Days of Marathon Training.

Day 122-151

May is the 1st of 7 consecutive months that incorporate 1 specific event that I will be training for and competing in. As this is the case, 30 days of running isn’t just 30 days of running around the block, its 30 days of constant pain, discomfort and improvement, to get my body ready for not only a Marathon, but an Ultramarathon in the month of May. Lots of long runs. Lots of interval training. Lots of pain.

**I will still be training in the pool 3 days per week, in preparation for my July Triathlons as well.

May: Challenge #6: GoodLife Toronto Marathon & 50 Mile Ultramarathon + 31 days cycling training

Day 152-182

My first 3 months built consistency and a winners, “no days off” mindset. I embraced the cold. I embraced kicks, punches, and critique. I embraced opening the body to new heights. And I embraced the mindset to train specifically for competition again. May 6th I compete in my first ever Marathon (25 Miles), ‘The GoodLife Toronto Marathon’. 3 weeks later I compete in my first ever Ultramarathon (50 Miles) on May 26th.

Since June is my cycling month, I will also be doing 30 days of cycling training in preparation for my month long cycling trip.

**I will also be incorporating 3 days/week of swimming as well (Iron-man prep).

http://www.torontomarathon.com/

http://www.burlingtonrunners.com/races/sulphur-springs-trail-race/

June: Challenge #7: Cycling the Trans Canada Trail for 30 days.

Day 183-212

June affords me the opportunity to get away for an entire month. Not in a fun vacation type of way, but in a “Hey, let’s bike 125-170 km everyday”, type of way. That’s right, I will be cycling 4500 km in 30 days, with no days off in between. My intention is to make it out to the Quebec River crossing in 15 days, and then cycle back, getting me back home by June 30th.

I will also be continuing my training for the 70.3 Ironman in July, by incorporating the split of brick-workouts which will look something like this: 1 day bike & run, next day bike & swim, with following day just bike. I will continue this routine for the entire month of June. Resistance training 3-4 days per week will also be incorporated.

https://thegreattrail.ca/

July: Challenge #8: July 6th Muskoka 70.3 Ironman & July 29th Niagara Sprint Triathlon. + 31 days of Triathlon training

Day 213-243

My month of July consists of 2 Triathlons: An Iron-man 70.3 on July 6th and a Sprint Triathlon on July 29th. Due to the 365 day component of my challenge, I will be doing Triathlon training every day of the month (bike, swim or run).

“The Muskoka 70.3 features a 1.2-mile, one-loop swim in the scenic Fairy Lake. The swim start is just 500m from the transition zone. The 56-mile bike course circles Lake of Bays, passing through the small communities of Dwight, Dorset, and Baysville. The 13.1-mile run will take you through Historic Downtown Huntsville and finishing at the gorgeous Canada Summit Centre.”

“Sprint triathlons are short-distance triathlons, usually consisting of a 750-meter swim, 20k-bike ride and a 5k-run. This is half the distance of an Olympic triathlon and less than a quarter of the distance of the Ironman.”

After the July 6th Iron-man, much of my emphasis will be on running, as I am in preparation for my biggest challenge to date, my August 100 mile Ultramarathon In Alberta.

http://www.ironman.com/triathlon/events/americas/ironman-70.3/muskoka.aspx

https://www.trisportcanada.com/races/niagara/

August: Challenge #9: 100 Mile Canadian Death Race + 31 days of Triathlon Training

Day 244-274

“Since the start of the millennium, racers have come to the Canadian Rockies to cheat Death in one of the world’s toughest ultramarathons. The 125km course begins and ends on a 4200-foot plateau, passes over three mountain summits, and not only includes over 17,000 feet of elevation change but a major river crossing at the spectacular Hell’s Gate canyon at the confluence of the Smoky and Sulphur Rivers. Each year, extreme athletes push themselves to the limits of their endurance against the breathtaking background of the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Well-trained and totally committed, they battle heat, cold, altitude, and their own demons. Finishing is the prize and the bragging rights are priceless.”

I couldn’t say it any better, so I’ll leave it at that.

*After my Canadian Death Race I will immediately be jumping back into Triathlon training, in preparation for my Sep 1st, Guelph II Sprint Triathlon.

https://www.canadiandeathrace.com/

September: Challenge #10: Guelph II Sprint Triathlon + 30 days of Ultramarathon training

Day 275-304

The race itself will by no means be easy, by I intend to perform very well, especially considering what my body has trained for over the previous 6 months. A shorter race makes more sense for this month since my body will be in a precarious position of discomfort from my 100 mile Ultra in August and the previous accumulative 273 days of my challenge.

Following the Guelph II Sprint Triathlon I will begin my training for the biggest challenge I will have ever faced, The 240 Mile MOAB Ultra-Marathon.

September’s training will consist of a great deal of incredibly long running sessions. My body will need to get accustomed to anywhere between 100-200 mile weeks of running prior to peaking for race week mid-October. Interval training will play a specific role on particular days as well.

https://www.trisportcanada.com/races/guelph-lake-11/

October: Challenge #11: MOAB 240 Mile Ultra-Marathon + 31 days of Ultramarathon training

Day 305-335

During the Moab 240, racers will face desert trails, slick rock, canyons, and mountain ranges. The course covers 29,467 feet of ascent and descent, and it is entirely non-stop, without stages or relays.

There are 14 aid stations 8–20 miles apart, with full sleep setups at a number of them. Caveat: Racers have a time limit of six hours for sleeping.

This by far will be the toughest physical and mental challenge to date. A challenge I look forward to meeting head on.

http://www.moab200.com/

November: Challenge #12: Ultra-Marathon in the States + 30 days of active recovery

336-365

November is TBA, as I am still undecided between a few locations. What is certain however, is I will be running a 50 Mile – 100 Mile Ultra in the Month of November.

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